Reagan Middle School

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      About Our School

      • Grades 6 – 8 | Traditional

        Reagan Middle School is a culturally diverse, traditional learning community with a rich heritage of celebrating deeply rooted school traditions. Our 7 pillars of knighthood are forefront to our campus culture and prepare young scholars to meet the changing demands of the 21st Century.

        Mission Statement

        Reagan Middle School is dedicated to creating a respectful environment where individuals learn and succeed by developing character, intellect, wellness, and a desire for life-long learning. We are committed to assuring learning experiences that will assist our students in achieving their greatest potential to adapt and adjust to a diverse and ever changing society.

        School Moto

        “Excellence IS the Standard”

        How to know Reagan Middle School is right for your child:

        1. Your child enjoys a variety of enrichment courses such as dance, band, orchestra, archery, and STEM.
        2. Your child desires to earn high school credits while in middle school.
        3. You child is self-motivated, self-disciplined, and creative.

        Unique ways your child can learn and grow here:

        • Technology-rich campus (all students provided an iPad to support academic achievement)
        • Rigorous coursework
        • Leadership opportunities
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      Curriculum Offerings

      • Spanish  Curriculum Offerings

        Our Jr. Knights can earn up to 10 High School Credits while in Middle School! 

        • Advanced Algebra 1
        • Advanced Geometry
        • Advanced English 1
        • Spanish 1
        • Spanish 2
        • Professional Communication/Health
        • Digital Media
        • Principles of Arts A/V Technology & Communications (PAAVTC)
        • Principles of IT
        • P.E. Foundations

        Core Courses:

        English Language Arts and Reading 6-8 and Advanced English I (ELA 6-8 & ENGI): The English language arts and reading Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) embody the interconnected nature of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking through the seven integrated strands of developing and sustaining foundational language skills; comprehension; response; multiple genres; author’s purpose and craft; composition; and inquiry and research. The strands focus on academic oracy (proficiency in oral expression and comprehension), authentic reading, and reflective writing to ensure a literate Texas. The strands are integrated and progressive with students continuing to develop knowledge and skills with increased complexity and nuance in order to think critically and adapt to the ever-evolving nature of language and literacy. The seven strands of the essential knowledge and skills for English language arts and reading are intended to be integrated for instructional purposes and are recursive in nature. Strands include the four domains of language (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and their application in order to accelerate the acquisition of language skills so that students develop high levels of social and academic language proficiency. Additionally, students should engage in academic conversations, write, read, and be read to on a daily basis with opportunities for cross-curricular content and student choice.

        The Advanced (formerly Pre-AP) English courses include all the standards covered in the English Language Arts and Reading courses. Students enrolled in this course have demonstrated superior skills and are sufficiently motivated to spend extra hours on challenging assignments, including autonomous, self-initiated study. Additional outside and summer reading to prepare for this course will be required. Students will be involved in enrichment activities, seminars, and in-depth study to help prepare them for future AP courses and examinations.

        Math 6-8, Algebra I, and Geometry:

        The primary focal areas in middle school are number and operations; proportionality; expressions, equations, and relationships; and measurement and data. Students use concepts, algorithms, and properties of rational numbers to explore mathematical relationships and to describe increasingly complex situations. Students use concepts of proportionality to explore, develop, and communicate mathematical relationships. Students use algebraic thinking to describe how a change in one quantity in a relationship results in a change in the other. Students connect verbal, numeric, graphic, and symbolic representations of relationships, including equations and inequalities. Students use geometric properties and relationships, as well as spatial reasoning, to model and analyze situations and solve problems. Students communicate information about geometric figures or situations by quantifying attributes, generalizing procedures from measurement experiences, and using the procedures to solve problems. Students use appropriate statistics, representations of data, and reasoning to draw conclusions, evaluate arguments, and make recommendations. While the use of all types of technology is important, the emphasis on algebra readiness skills necessitates the implementation of graphing technology. Students will also study personal financial literacy by applying mathematical process standards to develop an awareness of economic issues and a method for problem solving that is useful in life as a knowledgeable consumer and investor.

        In grade 6 ADVANCED Math students will learn and practice the critical thinking skills needed to analyze, solve, and explain complex math problems and to be successful in Algebra and Geometry followed by Advanced Placement classes and beyond. 

        Utilizing the College Board created resource: SpringBoard Course 1 Mathematics, students will learn to model functions in numerical, symbolic (equation), table, and graphical forms. Students will communicate mathematics verbally and in writing, justifying answers and clearly labeling charts and graphs. Students will continually explore mathematics and represent data in a variety of forms. Throughout the course students will use multiple representations to communicate their understanding of a math concept.

        In grade 7 ADVANCED Math students will learn and practice the critical thinking skills needed to analyze, solve, and explain complex math problems and to be successful in Algebra and Geometry followed by Advanced Placement classes and beyond. 

        Utilizing the College Board created resource: SpringBoard Course 2 Mathematics, students will learn to acquire an understanding of functions—in the context of algebra and graphs. Students will develop the ability to write, solve, and graph linear equations; recognize and verbalize patterns; and model slope as a rate of change. This course will enable students to communicate problem-solving methods and interpret results clearly while investigating concepts presented visually and verbally.

        In grade 8 ADVANCED Math students will learn and practice the critical thinking skills needed to analyze, solve, and explain complex math problems and to be successful in Algebra and Geometry followed by Advanced Placement classes and beyond. 

        Utilizing the College Board created resource: SpringBoard Course 3 Mathematics, students will write algebraic models from a variety of physical, numeric, and verbal descriptions. Students will solve equations using a variety of method while justifying answers using precise mathematical language. Students will build upon their previous understanding and relate constant rate of change to verbal, physical, and algebraic models. Students will explore the Use of technology and its application to solve problems. Students will Reinforce and extend the vocabulary of probability and statistics.

        In ADVANCED Algebra 1 students will build on the knowledge and skills for mathematics in grades 6-8, which provide a foundation in linear relationships, number and operations, and proportionality. Students will study linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and their related transformations, equations, and associated solutions. Students will connect functions and their associated solutions in both mathematical and real-world situations. Students will use technology to collect and explore data and analyze statistical relationships. In addition, students will study polynomials of degree one and two, radical expressions, sequences, and laws of exponents. Students will generate and solve linear systems with two equations and two variables and will create new functions through transformations.

        In ADVANCED Geometry the focus will be on more precise terminology, symbolic representations, and the development of proofs. Students will explore concepts covering coordinate and transformational geometry; logical argument and constructions; proof and congruence; similarity, proof, and trigonometry; two- and three-dimensional figures; circles; and probability. Students will connect previous knowledge from Algebra I to Geometry through the coordinate and transformational geometry strand. In the logical 25 arguments and constructions strand, students are expected to create formal constructions using a straightedge and compass. Though this course is primarily Euclidean geometry, students should complete the course with an understanding that non-Euclidean geometries exist. In proof and congruence, students will use deductive reasoning to justify, prove and apply theorems about geometric figures. Throughout the standards, the term “prove” means a formal proof to be shown in a paragraph, a flowchart, or two-column formats. Proportionality is the unifying component of the similarity, proof, and trigonometry strand. Students will use their proportional reasoning skills to prove and apply theorems and solve problems in this strand. The two- and three-dimensional figure strand focuses on the application of formulas in multi-step situations since students have developed background knowledge in two and three-dimensional figures. Using patterns to identify geometric properties, students will apply theorems about circles to determine relationships between special segments and angles in circles. 

        Science 6-8:

        Grade 6 Science is interdisciplinary in nature; however, much of the content focus is on physical science.

        Grade 7 Science is interdisciplinary in nature; however, much of the content focus is on organisms and the environment.

        Grade 8 Science is interdisciplinary in nature; however, much of the content focus is on earth and space science. 

        The ADVANCED Science 6-8 course includes all the material covered in Science Grade 6-8 with an emphasis on preparing students for Advanced and AP high school courses. Additional laboratory and research skills, as well as outside projects, will be encouraged.

        Social Studies 6-8:

        In Grade 6, students study people, places, and societies of the contemporary world. Societies for study are from the following regions of the world: Europe, Russia and the Eurasian republics, North America, Central America and the Caribbean, South America, Southwest Asia-North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Australia, and the Pacific realm. Students describe the influence of individuals and groups on historical and contemporary events in those societies and identify the locations and geographic characteristics of various societies. Students identify different ways of organizing economic and governmental systems. The concepts of limited and unlimited government are introduced, and students describe the nature of citizenship in various societies. Students compare institutions common to all societies such as government, education, and religious institutions. Students explain how the level of technology affects the development of the various societies and identify different points of view about events. The concept of frame of reference is introduced as an influence on an individual's point of view.

        In Grade 7, students study the history of Texas from early times to the present. Students examine the full scope of Texas history, including Natural Texas and its People; Age of Contact; Spanish Colonial; Mexican National; Revolution and Republic; Early Statehood; Texas in the Civil War and Reconstruction; Cotton, Cattle, and Railroads; Age of Oil; Texas in the Great Depression and World War II; Civil Rights and Conservatism; and Contemporary Texas eras. The focus in each era is on key individuals, events, and issues and their impact. Students identify regions of Texas and the distribution of population within and among the regions and explain the factors that caused Texas to change from an agrarian to an urban society. Students describe the structure and functions of municipal, county, and state governments, explain the influence of the U.S. Constitution on the Texas Constitution, and examine the rights and responsibilities of Texas citizens. Students use primary and secondary sources to examine the rich and diverse cultural background of Texas as they identify the different racial and ethnic groups that settled in Texas to build a republic and then a state. Students analyze the impact of scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the development of Texas in various industries such as agricultural, energy, medical, computer, and aerospace. Students use primary and secondary sources to acquire information about Texas.

        In Grade 8, students study the history of the United States from the early colonial period through Reconstruction. The knowledge and skills comprise the first part of a two-year study of U.S. history. The second part, comprising U.S. history from Reconstruction to the present, is provided in high school. The content in Grade 8 builds upon that from Grade 5 but provides more depth and breadth. Historical content focuses on the political, economic, religious, and social events and issues related to the colonial and revolutionary eras, the creation and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, challenges of the early republic, the Age of Jackson, westward expansion, sectionalism, Civil War, and Reconstruction. Students describe the physical characteristics of the United States and their impact on population distribution and settlement patterns in the past and present. Students analyze the various economic factors that influenced the development of colonial America and the early years of the republic and identify the origins of the free enterprise system. Students examine the American beliefs and principles, including limited government, checks and balances, federalism, separation of powers, and individual rights, reflected in the U.S. Constitution and other historical documents. Students evaluate the impact of Supreme Court cases and major reform movements of the 19th century and examine the rights and responsibilities of citizens of the United States as well as the importance of effective leadership in a constitutional republic. Students evaluate the impact of scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the development of the United States. Students use critical-thinking skills, including the identification of bias in written, oral, and visual material.

        For ADVANCED Social Studies 6-8 courses, the content and pacing is the same as on-level. Differentiation should be occurring through opportunities to elaborate/extend understanding, increased frequency/numbers/rigor of sources to analyze/process; increased opportunities for writing practice to prepare students for future AP courses in Social Studies.  Writing will support FRQs, SAQs, and DBQ essays.

        Extracurricular Clubs & Activities:

        • Kindness Club
        • Yearbook            
        • National Junior Honor Society (NJHS)
        • Student Council

        Fine Arts Courses (Grade 6-8)

        • Band
        • Choir
        • Dance
        • Orchestra
        • Theatre Arts
        • Visual Arts

        Elective Courses

        Grade 6:

        • Archery
        • Leadership (similar to an AVID program)

        Grade 7:

        • Archery
        • Athletics (Football, Volleyball, Basketball, Cheerleading, Track, Soccer)
        • Digital Media 
        • Spanish 1 & 2
        • STEM

        Grade 8:

        • Archery
        • Athletics (Football, Volleyball, Basketball, Cheerleading, Track, Soccer)
        • Professional Communication/Health
        • P.E. Foundations
        • Principles of Arts A/V Technology & Communications (PAAVTC)
        • Principles of IT 
        • Spanish 1 & 2
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      Extracurricular Opportunities

      • Extracurricular Opportunities

        Art

        art

        Art is an introduction to the visual arts and working with drawing, painting, and three-dimensional techniques. Students will experiment with a wide variety of art materials.  Emphasis will be on the four strands of the visual arts: observation and perception, creative expression, historical and cultural relevance, and critical evaluation and response. The District will provide most art materials.

        Dance

        This class is for students without prior dance background.  Students will learn the fundamental skills in different types of dance including ballet, jazz, modern, hip hop, choreography studies and dances from different cultures.  Students will perform various dance routines.  There are no student fees for this class.

        Beginning Choir

        Beginning choir will guide students in the development of vocal skills and beginning music theory. Students participate in a variety of performance and contest opportunities.  Contest fees are paid for by the school district.  This is a performance – based class. Students and parents can expect several evening and/or Saturday performances during the school year.

        Beginning Band

        Beginning Band

        Beginner band is made up of primarily 6th graders. Beginner band is designed for students who are interested in starting one of the following instruments: flute, oboe, bassoon, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, French horn, trombone, euphonium, tuba, and percussion.  The primary focus for this class is on basic instrumental skill development and music reading.  The goal of the class is to develop the student so that he or she can enter into either Concert or Symphonic Band.  Students are split into instrument families of brass, woodwind, and percussion. Instrument and contest fees are paid for by the school district.  This is a performance-based class. (students and parents can expect several evening and/or Saturday performances during the school year.

        Beginning Orchestra

        Beginner Orchestra is made up of primarily 6th graders.  The primary focus for this class is on basic instrumental skill development and music reading.  The goal of the class is to develop the student so that he or she can enter into either Concert or Symphonic Orchestra.  Instrument and contest fees are paid for by the school district.  This is a performance-based class. (students and parents can expect several evening and/or Saturday performances during the school year.)

        Theater Arts

        This class consists of basic acting techniques, the role of the actor in interpreting dramatic literature, introduction to stagecraft and technical theatre. (All students will perform and participate in acting activities, scenes and performances. (Students will participate in at least one play or performance in front of a live audience.

        Technology Applications

        Through the study of technology applications, students make informed decisions by understanding current and emerging technologies, including technology systems, appropriate digital tools, and personal learning networks. (As competent researchers and responsible digital citizens, students use creative and computational thinking to solve problems while developing career and college readiness skills.

        Leadership

        This class helps students develop organizational and study skills, critical thinking, and the ability to ask probing questions. (It provides opportunities to receive academic help from peers and participate in enrichment and motivational activities to make their school success reality.

        Extracurricular Clubs & Activities:

        • Kindness Club
        • Yearbook     
        • National Junior Arts Society (NJAS)            
        • National Junior Honor Society (NJHS)
        • Student Council
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      Frequently Asked Questions

      • What elective offerings do you have for my 6th-grader?

      • Can I do a campus tour and how would I schedule that?

      • Can my child participate in athletics?

      • Is there a bus route that comes to my neighborhood?

      • Where can I find more about your campus?